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Pit Bike Help

I can’t get spark on my pit bike

In order for fuel vapor to ignite, there needs to be an efficient flow of electricity to activate the spark plug. However, from time to time, the current is blocked, either due to a problem with the ignition system or the spark plug itself. Below are the steps to take in order to fix the issue of a spark not igniting inside the combustion chamber.

  1. Remove the spark plug from the cylinder block.
  2. Place the loose spark plug back in the ignition coil, then hold the ignition coil with the plug inserted and touch the spark plug to a bolt on the engine block.
  3. Attempt to kick start the pit bike and see if you notice a spark at the end of the spark plug as you apply pressure to the starter. If you have an automatic starter, you can accomplish the same task by pressing the start button.
  4. If you don’t see a spark coming from the plug, replace the old plug with a new spark plug (recommended for your pit bike) and retest. This test will determine whether or not the missing spark issue is related to the spark plug or other electrical component. If you’ve completed this test and still don’t see a spark coming from the plug, double check all electrical connections including the plug wire connection to the ignition coil, kill switch or cdi. Repeat this step after checking each individual component. If still no spark, proceed to the next step.
  5. If you’ve checked all connections, tried multiple spark plugs and don’t notice a spark coming from the plug that is placed next to a metal bolt, unplug the kill switch from the electrical box on the pit bike and reattempt.

If after the above steps you still don’t notice a spark coming from the plug, it’s likely one of three component failures – the cdi, ignition coil or the starter assembly. At this point, we’d recommend calling our support team and finding an authorized pit bike mechanic to fix the issue.

Category: Pit Bike Help

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Normal Maintenance

Normal scheduled maintenance for a pit bike can extend the lifecycle of your new toy considerably. From oil changes to replacing air filters on a timely basis, investing time in completing some of the suggested maintenance tips below can significantly improve performance and enjoyment of any pit bike. All the information provided below is a simple starting point of a normal maintenance program, but does not guarantee that mechanical breakdown won’t occur. If you have additional questions about the service tips listed below, feel free to contact our customer service department.

Understanding the Break-In Period

The break in period of a pit bike is typically your first three rides which individually last no longer than 10 minutes for each ride. Once this process is complete, we recommend making a few changes to your pit bike and completing a few recommended maintenance check-ups to ensure all moving parts are property tightened and ready for full use.

    1. Tighten the spokes. To do this, from the valve stem, tighten every third spoke. Please refer to the above image for location of the spokes.
    2. Tighten your chain. After your first 3 initial rides, your chain is going to stretch. It is important to keep your chain tightened to the appropriate tension to avoid chain malfunction while riding. You will also want to check your chain every time before you ride.
  1. Replace your Spark Plugs. Even though the spark plugs that come with our bikes are decent, you will always want to upgrade your spark plug to a NKG Spark Plug (Part number CR7HSA Plug BX/10NKG). Doing this will greatly improve your horsepower and the performance of the bike with little cost to you.
  2. Apply fork oil to the front forks. Typically after the first rides, front forks can be made stiffer by adding fork oil. To do this, visit your local pit bike dealer or contact Variety Powersports to inquire as to which brand or type of fork oil is best for your specific pit bike.
  3. Adjust your rear shock for comfort. The rear shock can be loosened or tightened at the rear spring. Although not required, it’s a good idea to understand this fact so you can fine-tune your suspension to match your comfort level and riding preference.
  4. Adjust handlebars for safety. The handlebars are also adjustable so that you can pick a riding position that makes it easier to steer your pit bike but also for easy application of throttle and brake handles for safety.
  5. Fill up gas with Premium Unleaded Gasoline. Pit bikes sold from Variety Powersports are performance engines that require a cleaner grade of gasoline. It’s recommended to run a minimum of 89 octane to 91 octane unleaded gasoline. It is NOT recommended to add fuel additives or performance boosters as that can lead to premature wear and tear of valve train components. DO NOT USE MIXED GASOLINE typically used for two-stroke motors.

As with any product we sell at Variety Powersports, your complete satisfaction is our primary goal. The above maintenance tips will help you fine-tune your pit bike to your personal standards, but also provide you with a baseline to extend parts life and enjoy your pit bike for years.

Category: Pit Bike Help

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Pre-Riding Checklist for Pitster Pro

Buying a new Bike and uncrating it is exciting for anyone. However, like any other mechanical piece, it’s always a good idea to complete a full safety inspection before starting the motor and taking it for a test spin. Noted below is a checklist we’ve created, along with the below infographic that will provide you with a step by step list of items to verify before you start the bike.

    1. Check all fluid levels including; brake fluid and engine oil. We recommend using a full synthetic engine oil after the engine break in process. It’s also a good idea to change brake fluid to DOT 4 or better brake fluid after the break in process.
    1. Check all the nuts and bolts to make sure everyone is tight.
  1. Although we recommend applying Loctite to all the nuts of your new machine, there are a few spots that should specifically be checked. Pay special attention to the following areas:
    • The master cylinder, axel nut and brake pedal bolts
    • Sub frame, chain slider and chain roller bolts
    • Fuel tank, triple clamp bolts and all bar riser bolts
    • Caliper bolts, rotor and spacer bolts
    • All rotor and brake spacer bolts, front brake caliper and fork guard bolts
    • Sprocket bolts and chain guide bolts
  2. Oil the air filter with high quality foam filter oil. Note: it’s important to keep your air filter properly cleaned and oiled to keep your engine running strong.

If during any phase of this checklist you notice something “just not right” with any part of the pit bike, feel free to contact our customer service department at Killer Motorsports and speak with one of our service technicians.

Category: Pit Bike Help

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My Breaks Are Having Trouble

Problems with brakes, whether it’s the front, back or both is not a minor issue that should be put on the back burner. Besides being an alert pit bike rider, fully functional brakes are the primary safety device of any pit bike. If you notice a problem with your brakes being soft or taking time to engage when the brake pedals or handles are depressed, there are a few steps you should take to solve the problems often associated with low brake pressure.

  1. Check the brake lines fittings for any leaking brake fluid. Most brake pressure problems occur when air enters the brake lines or if fluid is lost through the brake system. By visually checking the brake lines, each connection and surrounding area for signs of leaking fluid, you can minimize your search for the problem.
  2. If you don’t instantly notice a loose fitting or signs of brake fluid leaks, clean all lines and fittings with carb cleaner or degreaser product. Make sure all lines are completely dry then apply the brakes and see if you can find any signs of leaks coming from the brake lines or fittings.
  3. Next, check your brake fluid reservoir and check your brake fluid level. If the level is below the “fill” line, fill the brake reservoir with recommended brake fluid for your brand of pit bike. Close the brake fluid cap, test your brake pressure again.
  4. If you’ve followed the first three steps and still don’t see any leaking fluid, it’s probable that your brakes need to be bled. To bleed your brakes, you’ll need an 8mm opened-end wrench, and a collection can of some sort to place next to the bleed screws on the brakes. Note: If you’re not comfortable with bleeding brakes, please have a professional mechanic accomplish this for you.
  5. To begin the brake bleeding, push down on your brake pedal or handle until you have pressure, and hold. Then loosen the bleed bolt and let the air out of the lines and then tighten the bolt quickly. Pump the brakes and see if you have pressure again. If not, try this a few more times. You also probably need to put more fluid in your lines after completing the brake bleed. Check the level. If it is low, put more fluid in and then bleed the brakes again. Continue this process until your brake pedal pressure has returned to the way it was before you noticed the soft pedal condition.

If you’ve checked and repaired any leaking brake lines, bled the brake system and still have issues with soft brakes, it’s likely that the problem is with the brake pads or brake caliper and should be replaced by a certified pit bike mechanic.

Category: Pit Bike Help

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My bike is sputtering whenever I give it full throttle

The problem of having an engine “sputter” is typically caused by a fuel system issue. For pit bikes with smaller cc displacement engines, in order for a cylinder to fire efficiently, three separate components must work together; the fuel delivery system (carburetor), the ignition coil and wires and the spark plug. Typically with most pit bikes, the problem is going to be with the spark plug or the carburetor; with the fuel system being the primary culprit.

The first step we recommend is to check the efficiency of the spark plug. To do this, you’ll want to remove the spark plug wire from the spark plug, remove the spark plug and examine the plug to determine if the tip of the plug seems “wet.” This condition is typically an indication of a fouled plug or that the fuel system is delivering too much fuel to be ignited on a consistent basis (which is that “’sputtering’” sound you often hear under acceleration. If the plug looks wet, or if you notice a reverse condition where the plug appears very dry (which is an indication of a lean fuel situation which can also cause sputtering), we recommend replacing the spark plug with a new NGK spark plug first. The spark plug is a CR6HSA or CR7HSA NGK.

The next thing that you want to check and clean the carburetor. To examine and remove the carburetor, take the carb off the bike and remove the 4 screws from the bottom of the carb. At this point, you’ll see two gold screws. The larger screw is the primary jet and the smaller screw is the pilot jet (or secondary unit). While ensuring you are wearing safety glasses, apply carb cleaner vigorously through the holes of the jets and through the entire carburetor. You should then use compressed air to blow any gunk or debris that could be stuck in the jets or the bottom bowl inside the carburetor.

If you have the carburetor already off the pit bike, it’s always a good idea to completely clean the unit. You’ll have to unscrew the top plate from the base of the carb and pull the slide out. Whenever you pull the slide out, take the needle out of the slide and move the “c” clip on the needle up one slot. Follow the steps above for cleaning all components inside the carburetor and reassemble. Put everything back together and check the performance of your pit bike and the ‘sputtering’ issue. If the issue continues, it’s possible that the carburetor is defective.

Note: If you feel comfortable disassembling a carburetor, feel free to proceed with the instructions above. However, if you don’t feel comfortable, contact our technical team and we can help you through the process or recommend a local mechanic.

Category: Pit Bike Help

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