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ATV Help

My ATV is Leaking Gas Into the Intake

The ATVs that are sold through Variety Powersports are smaller cc-displacement engines with two distinct fuel systems; carbureted or fuel injected. Typically the problem of having your ATV leaking gas into the intake manifold is reserved to carbureted engines. When this occurs, it means the floats are stuck or you have a clogged jet. The solution to this problem is to clean the carburetor, fuel lines and supporting fuel system parts.

Posted below are instructions on how to clean your ATV carburetor :

  1. To clean your carburetor you will need to take the carb off the ATV. There are usually 2 to 4 screws on the bottom of the carb you will need to remove.
  2. Once you remove these you will have access to the float bowl as well as your jets. Your jets look like two gold screws with holes in them. Unscrew your jets and make sure nothing is clogging them. Your float is usually white and you will need to make sure it moves up and down freely.
  3. Sometimes your floats can get gummed up and get stuck so they are stuck open. Clean the bottom inside of your carburetor and the bottom of the bowl with carb cleaner and this should get out most of the residue.
  4. Reassemble your carburetor, reattach to the ATV, reconnect all hoses and cables and test fire your ATV to verify there are no leaks.
Category: ATV Help

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My Unit Just Dies When I Come To A Stop

One of the most frustrating problems to troubleshoot for an ATV is when you’re driving along, come to a stop and your ATV simply shuts off for no apparent reason. In most cases, you’ll be able to restart the ATV and ride back to your base camp or home before so you can spend some time to diagnose the issue. If you have done everything from checking the gas to cleaning the carb to reading everything in this section, then chances are it’s time for a valve adjustment. The question that many of our customers often ask us is – why?

Typically, when an engine shuts off when it comes to a stop it is an indication of a loss of fuel pressure or efficiency of the fuel/air mix into the combustion chamber. The part of a combustion engine that regulates the flow of fuel/air mix into the combustion chamber is the cylinder intake valves. However, new fuel and air can’t burn efficiently if the previously burned fuel is not properly expelled through the exhaust values either.

Like any moving part, the valves of a combustion chamber eventually become loose and require adjustment. For an ATV, this typically occurs if you have around 1,000 miles on the unit. However, since the adjustment and removal of cylinder head hardware is a complex process, we’d recommend that you contact our sales team for proper vale adjustment specifications and then consult an ATV mechanical specialist to complete this job.

Category: ATV Help

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My MPH is Not Registering Properly

The performance of an ATV or any combustion engine is commonly consistent as long as proper maintenance has been performed. However, occasionally it may appear as if the MPH or top end power of an ATV seems to be slower than an owner might remember. There are a few items that you should consider when you believe that your ATVs MPH is way off when you are driving the ATV.

In regards to engine performance of a small cc-displaced, four-stroke engine, there are two major factors that can (and often will) impact the top end speed or mph of the ATV; the amount of oxygen and fuel entering the combustion chamber and being able to be fully burned, or the application of that horsepower to the rear wheel. Typically, top end speed is caused by a lack of power coming from the engine. There can be an easy answer to this problem or some potentially serious issues that are causing the lack of engine performance.

    • Location of Where You are Riding Occasionally we will bring our ATVs with us on vacation, or for extended trips away from where our typical riding takes place. If this is the case, the location of where you are riding can be a major reason why performance seems to have dropped; especially at higher altitudes along with weather conditions. With higher altitude comes less oxygen, and since a combustion engine needs oxygen in order to mix with fuel to burn efficiently, a reduction in oxygen will result in less power. However, if you’re a casual rider, just remember that the higher you climb, the less your motor will be able to breathe; and thus, the less power it will produce.
    • Weather Conditions Just as higher altitude will reduce the amount of oxygen in the air, so can weather conditions. When it’s hot and humid outside and the barometric pressure is low, this is another indication of a reduction of oxygen percentage in the air we breathe. When the weather is cool and dry, and barometric pressure is high it means that the oxygen level is higher than normal. This is a reason why many ATV riders notice that their bikes will “slow down” when it’s hot and humid, and run very quick when it’s cool and dry.
    • Problems with the Engine If weather conditions haven’t changed much or you’re not riding in higher altitude locations like mountains, then it’s likely that the reduction of top end MPH is due to potential engine problems. The most common reason for lack of performance with an ATV is either fuel flow that is restricted, not enough fuel / air mixture entering the combustion chamber, or a loss of engine compression. This could be caused by cylinder head valve seals, piston rings or other potential internal engine issues. On some ATVs there is a MPH sensor that can also be checked. From time to time this sensor can be too loose or too tight. This sensor is located near the back of the motor, located on the passenger side of the gear box that attaches to the rear drive shaft.

If you’ve checked into all of these issues and still can’t determine why your ATVs MPH is way off, contact Variety Powersports or an authorized repair facility for the brand, make and model of ATV you own.

Category: ATV Help

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Temperature Sensor Stays On All The Time

Keeping track of engine temperature is very important with an ATV. This job is relegated to the temperature sensor, which operates an indicator light located on the ATV dash control. Occasionally this temperature sensor will stay illuminated for an extended period of time. Usually this means one of two things – either you have a bad sensor or something came unplugged. Here is the process that you should follow if this is happening to you.

    1. The first step is that you’ll need to remove the seat(s) and then take off the center console.
    2. You’ll then need to find the temperature sensor which is located on what would be a passenger side of a vehicle (the right side when looking at the ATV from the rear). Find the carburetor. Once you find the carb, right under will be a gold-fitted sensor plug that is plugged into the motor. Follow the wire that comes off that plug and about 12 inches down that wire will plug into the wiring harness.
    3. Once you’ve verified that the location of the temperature sensor and wiring harness, make sure that it is plugged into the wiring harness. It is very common that it can become unplugged. If it is plugged in, then you probably have a bad sensor due to the fact that it is not reading any temperature off the motor – which will cause the light to remain illuminated for an extended period of time; even if the motor is cold.

If you’ve checked the temperature sensor and found that it’s plugged in, contact Variety Powersports to determine if we have a replacement part that you need. If we don’t have one, we will point you in the right direction as to where to purchase the appropriate parts

Category: ATV Help

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My Unit Won’t Start

When you have a situation where your ATV won’t start, it’s typically due to two reasons; the motor or specifically the starter motor won’t engage, or if engaged, the motor won’t fire. This means that the culprit is electrical or fuel related. To solve this problem, there are a few steps you should take to troubleshoot and then solve the issue.

Check the battery If your engine won’t crank over, it’s most likely an electrical problem. The first thing you should check is the battery and make sure it has a 100% charge. If your battery is fully charged, and your motor wont crank over, make sure to verify that the kill switch is pulled out. If this is not the problem, it’s most likely a damaged starter motor and should be examined or replaced by a professional mechanic.
Check the fuel system If the engine on your ATV will crank over, but won’t fire, it’s going to be either a fuel or electrical related issue. To determine if it’s a fuel problem, you should inspect the fuel line that runs from the gas tank to the fuel pump. You’ll want to make sure that there is nothing in the fuel line or that there are no pinches in the line that might cause fuel flow restriction. If you notice any obstructions, or objects in the fuel line, remove the fuel line and clean. Reattach the fuel line and test the solution.
Check the ignition system Remove your spark plug and put the plug back into the ignition coil, hold the coil with your handle and put the plug onto a ground or the engine, then have someone try to start it; see if the spark plug starts. If the plug does not spark, change your plug with a new spark plug and retest. If it still doesn’t spark, then you most likely have a faulty ignition coil.

These three issues are the most common problems that are found with an ATV that won’t start. If you’ve tried all three of these areas, or simply don’t feel comfortable with this type of maintenance, contact a local ATV mechanic or call our service department at Variety Powersports for recommendations.

Category: ATV Help

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My Unit Bogs at Higher Speeds

A “bog” when under-accelerating is a problem that occurs with many ATV owners; however, it’s not always caused by a major mechanical failure. A bog or the lowering of the RPM band under acceleration is typically caused by an obstruction of fuel or air into the combustion chamber. This area has air or fuel lines that are blocked by debris of some type. If you have been doing a lot of mud or loose sand riding, it’s more likely the air filter is dirty and simply needs to be cleaned. However, if you’ve been casual with your ATV riding, on street or dirt, it’s most likely going to be a problem with the fuel system. Here are a few things you can do to diagnose and fix a bogging problem that is related to the fuel system.

  1. Inspect the fuel line that runs from the gas tank to the fuel pump. You’ll want to make sure that there is nothing in the fuel line or that there are no pinches in the line that might cause fuel flow restriction. If you notice any obstructions, or objects in the fuel line, remove the fuel line and clean. Reattach the fuel line and test the solution.
  2. Inspect the fuel line from the fuel pump to the engine. Once you’ve checked the first fuel line connections from the tank to the pump, you’ll then want to test the connection from the pump to the engine. Remove the fuel line from the engine (either the fuel injector or carb) and place the fuel hose in a clear bottle so you can see the flow of fuel. Turn the key to the on position and press the start button. This will activate the fuel pump. If the volume of fuel is consistent and flowing at a solid rate, the pump is good. If there is very little fuel coming out, the problem is most likely a faulty fuel pump or clogged fuel filter and should be replaced.
Category: ATV Help

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Maintenance

Routine maintenance for any mechanical product is the best insurance policy that any consumer can invest. This definitely applies to the ATVs that we sell at Variety Powersports. All-Terrain Vehicles are built to handle extreme road conditions and take a tremendous amount of abuse. Due to these facts, owners should take proactive measures to create a maintenance schedule that will ensure their ATVs last longer and ride with optimal performance. Here are a few particular items to consider when creating your maintenance program.

    • Oil Most of our ATVs are shipped to customers with oil already inside the engine crank case. However, this is a break in oil that should only be run for about 30 minutes. Once you’ve started your ATV and have run it for about 30 minutes with moderate throttle, you need to change this oil and replace it with new oil. Here are the steps that you should follow to change oil for an ATV sold through Variety Powersports.
      1. Gather the appropriate tools and supplies including a 17mm (in most cases) end wrench, oil collection bucket, rags and replacement oil (follow manufacturer’s specific recommendations however, 10W40 conventional or blend oil is best).
      2. Locate the oil drain bolt in the center section of the engine pan – it is typically a 17mm bolt. With the engine turned OFF, remove the bolt and drain all oil into a collection device.
      3. Locate the oil filler cap, remove the cap and continue to let the oil drain for a few minutes. Once the oil has stopped draining, reinstall the oil drain plug and tighten BEFORE you pour the new oil into the reservoir. Tighten the oil cap after all oil has been inserted into the engine, start the engine and verify that the “oil” light does not come on once the engine has been running for at least one minute.
      4. It’s recommended to replace your oil every 10 to 15 hours of operation.
    • Spark Plug The spark plug is an important part of keeping your unit running in tip-top shape. Every time you start your unit, carbon is burned onto the tip of your spark plug. Eventually carbon can build up and weaken the intensity of the spark you are getting to your motor and cause your unit not to run at 100%. Every so often, maybe every time you change your oil, check your spark plug to see if it needs replacing. Most consumers will replace their spark plugs every other oil change with ATVs. The spark plug you will need is an NGK CR6HSA Plug.
    • Gasoline Premium Unleaded Gasoline should be the only fuel used for ATVs. The small cc-displacement motors can make a tremendous amount of power; however, these engines were manufactured to operate on premium unleaded gasoline. Although the engines will run with regular unleaded gasoline, over a period of time, performance of the engine will decline, carbon buildup on spark plugs will increase and the lifespan of the motor could be compromised. UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES SHOULD YOU EVER RUN RACING GASOLINE or ANY LEAD-BASED ADDITIVES in your ATV. Please contact the manufacturer for any recommendations they would make in regards to fuel stabilizers, especially if you store your ATV for extended periods without operation.
    • Brakes The brake system of an ATV is a critical safety measure that should be included in your routine maintenance program. Make sure you inspect your brakes during every oil change and check a few specific items such as – remove debris, check and inspect brake pad integrity, and inspect for any brake fluid leaking from lines or the master cylinder. Operation of ATVs in sand or compact dirt can cause brakes to wear faster due to friction caused by dirt and sand on the brake rotors. If you notice that your brakes are spongey or the ATV does not stop as well as it used to, it’s probably time to have your brakes replaced.
    • Chain Most ATVs are chain-driven. As such, making sure your chain is tight and adjusted correctly is another important maintenance step. If a chain is loose, it can snap or cause extended damage to your engine, transmission or the drive axel. There are chain adjusters located on the bottom of the swing-arm for you to service the chain. If you are not comfortable with adjusting the chain, contact Variety Powersports and we’ll help you find a service expert.

 

    • Radiator There are two types of cooling systems with the ATVs we sell at Variety Powersports; air cooled and water cooled. When you first get your ATV, if it is one that is liquid cooled, you’ll need to do the following:
      1. Make sure that your radiator fluid is filled up to full. Most of the time it is full, but sometimes it is close to empty.
      2. Anytime you add coolant to your radiator, it needs to have a 50/50 mix of recommended coolant with distilled water.
      3. You should always run your engine for about 10 minutes and let the engine heat up and then refill your radiator unit to ensure the radiator unit is full. When you run your engine, the heat will run out the bubbles that can be in your lines. This is why you will need to add more fluid.

The items listed above represent the majority of service areas recommended for ATVs. It’s also important to routinely check the tires for proper inflation and wear, tighten bolts occasionally and replace fuel and air filters as recommended by the manufacturer. For specifics about recommended maintenance for these items, refer to your ATV owner’s manual that was included in your shipment.

Category: ATV Help

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Starting Instructions

The first time you start a new ATV is arguably the most important. Although each engine has been checked and inspected by the manufacturer before it was shipped, your initial starting will be the first with all components attached and working together. Once you’ve successfully assembled your ATV from Killer Motorsports and have a fully charged battery installed inside the ATV, you need to check a few things before engaging the starter. Here is a generic check list of items you should verify before you start the ATV:

    1. Verify that the battery is connected: It’s common for people to install the battery without properly hooking up cables or making a mistake on attaching a positive lead to a negative terminal. Before you insert a key or begin to start the bike, make sure your battery is correctly installed and all wires are engaged.
    1. Verify the gas tank is full of premium unleaded gasoline: Each ATV sold by Killer Motorsports is recommended to use premium grade (minimum of 89 octane) unleaded gasoline. Make sure you do not use mixed or leaded gasoline or other fuel additives – especially for the initial start.
    1. Insert the Key and turn to ‘on’ position: The ‘on’ position is the first click you’ll feel and hear when you engage the key. Do Not press a starter button until all steps have been completed.
    1. Engage the handlebar brake: Make sure that your emergency handlebar brake is pulled in and locked before starting the ATV. There is a safety device built into the ATV that requires that the brakes be applied in order for the unit to start.
  1. Check the kill switch: Make sure the kill switch is not on the position with the half circle with the “X” inside. The switch needs to be on the empty half-moon circle.

After you’ve successfully completed each step above, and in this order, you’ll be ready to start your bike. While sitting on the bike with your foot on the rear brake pedal; press the start button and hold it down until the engine starts. Once the engine starts, release the starter button. If the engine does not start after engaging the starter for at least 30 seconds, refer to the diagnostic section to begin troubleshooting starting issues or contact our tech support team at Killer Motorsports.

Category: ATV Help

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Assembly

The ATVs that we sell at Killer Motorsports are engineered with high-quality parts and are mostly assembled directly by the manufacturer or our top team in the warehouse. However, in order to keep shipping costs down and to ensure the structural integrity of all moving parts, many of our ATVs require the end customer to put together the final pieces to complete assembly. Listed below are the general assembly instructions for most of the Chinese-built ATVs sold through Killer Motorsports.

  1. Completely Unpack the Crate: Open the top of the shipping crate and remove all of the protective wrapping from the interior of the crate. Once the protective wrapping has been removed, take out all tools, wheels, and racks. Place them in a separate area away from the shipping crate but easily accessible for assembly. Once the crate has been emptied, take the ATV off the bottom of the crate and set it on the ground.
  2. Attach the tires and wheels: To put on the tires you will need to prop up one side of the ATV with a jack stand and mount one side of tires/wheels at a time. You can also use a multipurpose jack stand to hoist the ATV up completely if you’d like. Once the first side tires and wheels have been installed, complete installation of the remaining two wheels.
  3. Install support racks: Once the tires have been mounted, and properly torqued to the manufacturers recommended pressure, you should then attach any racks if your ATV includes them. The bolts and mounting hardware will be included in the tool kit if applicable.
  4. Install Handlebars: Most of the ATVs sold at Killer Motorsports will have the handlebars packaged inside the crate and need to be assembled. To accomplish, unpack the handlebar mounts that are located in the tool and assembly kit. Follow the specific directions supplied by the manufacturer for proper mounting of the handlebars. *NOTE: Make sure to properly center and tighten handlebars to the manufacturers recommended pressure for safety and better riding experience.
  5. Install Battery: As each ATV manufacturer is unique, the installation instructions for batteries will be specific to the brand and model of your ATV. Follow the directions supplied for proper battery installation steps. *NOTE: It is recommended that prior to use, that you charge the battery for a minimum of 24 hours. Failure to complete this important step may result in inefficient operation and charging of the battery or premature wear.
  6. Add Lubricants as recommended by the manufacturer: Follow the instructions provided for adding lubricants including oil and coolants (if needed).

If you discover that there are any parts missing from the crate in step one of the assembly listed above, please contact the sales and support team at Killer Motorsports before moving on with additional assembly.

Category: ATV Help

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