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ATV Help

My ATV is Leaking Gas Into the Intake

The ATVs that are sold through Variety Powersports are smaller cc-displacement engines with two distinct fuel systems; carbureted or fuel injected. Typically the problem of having your ATV leaking gas into the intake manifold is reserved to carbureted engines. When this occurs, it means the floats are stuck or you have a clogged jet. The solution to this problem is to clean the carburetor, fuel lines and supporting fuel system parts.

Posted below are instructions on how to clean your ATV carburetor :

  1. To clean your carburetor you will need to take the carb off the ATV. There are usually 2 to 4 screws on the bottom of the carb you will need to remove.
  2. Once you remove these you will have access to the float bowl as well as your jets. Your jets look like two gold screws with holes in them. Unscrew your jets and make sure nothing is clogging them. Your float is usually white and you will need to make sure it moves up and down freely.
  3. Sometimes your floats can get gummed up and get stuck so they are stuck open. Clean the bottom inside of your carburetor and the bottom of the bowl with carb cleaner and this should get out most of the residue.
  4. Reassemble your carburetor, reattach to the ATV, reconnect all hoses and cables and test fire your ATV to verify there are no leaks.
Category: ATV Help

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My Unit Just Dies When I Come To A Stop

One of the most frustrating problems to troubleshoot for an ATV is when you’re driving along, come to a stop and your ATV simply shuts off for no apparent reason. In most cases, you’ll be able to restart the ATV and ride back to your base camp or home before so you can spend some time to diagnose the issue. If you have done everything from checking the gas to cleaning the carb to reading everything in this section, then chances are it’s time for a valve adjustment. The question that many of our customers often ask us is – why?

Typically, when an engine shuts off when it comes to a stop it is an indication of a loss of fuel pressure or efficiency of the fuel/air mix into the combustion chamber. The part of a combustion engine that regulates the flow of fuel/air mix into the combustion chamber is the cylinder intake valves. However, new fuel and air can’t burn efficiently if the previously burned fuel is not properly expelled through the exhaust values either.

Like any moving part, the valves of a combustion chamber eventually become loose and require adjustment. For an ATV, this typically occurs if you have around 1,000 miles on the unit. However, since the adjustment and removal of cylinder head hardware is a complex process, we’d recommend that you contact our sales team for proper vale adjustment specifications and then consult an ATV mechanical specialist to complete this job.

Category: ATV Help

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My MPH is Not Registering Properly

The performance of an ATV or any combustion engine is commonly consistent as long as proper maintenance has been performed. However, occasionally it may appear as if the MPH or top end power of an ATV seems to be slower than an owner might remember. There are a few items that you should consider when you believe that your ATVs MPH is way off when you are driving the ATV.

In regards to engine performance of a small cc-displaced, four-stroke engine, there are two major factors that can (and often will) impact the top end speed or mph of the ATV; the amount of oxygen and fuel entering the combustion chamber and being able to be fully burned, or the application of that horsepower to the rear wheel. Typically, top end speed is caused by a lack of power coming from the engine. There can be an easy answer to this problem or some potentially serious issues that are causing the lack of engine performance.

    • Location of Where You are Riding Occasionally we will bring our ATVs with us on vacation, or for extended trips away from where our typical riding takes place. If this is the case, the location of where you are riding can be a major reason why performance seems to have dropped; especially at higher altitudes along with weather conditions. With higher altitude comes less oxygen, and since a combustion engine needs oxygen in order to mix with fuel to burn efficiently, a reduction in oxygen will result in less power. However, if you’re a casual rider, just remember that the higher you climb, the less your motor will be able to breathe; and thus, the less power it will produce.
    • Weather Conditions Just as higher altitude will reduce the amount of oxygen in the air, so can weather conditions. When it’s hot and humid outside and the barometric pressure is low, this is another indication of a reduction of oxygen percentage in the air we breathe. When the weather is cool and dry, and barometric pressure is high it means that the oxygen level is higher than normal. This is a reason why many ATV riders notice that their bikes will “slow down” when it’s hot and humid, and run very quick when it’s cool and dry.
    • Problems with the Engine If weather conditions haven’t changed much or you’re not riding in higher altitude locations like mountains, then it’s likely that the reduction of top end MPH is due to potential engine problems. The most common reason for lack of performance with an ATV is either fuel flow that is restricted, not enough fuel / air mixture entering the combustion chamber, or a loss of engine compression. This could be caused by cylinder head valve seals, piston rings or other potential internal engine issues. On some ATVs there is a MPH sensor that can also be checked. From time to time this sensor can be too loose or too tight. This sensor is located near the back of the motor, located on the passenger side of the gear box that attaches to the rear drive shaft.

If you’ve checked into all of these issues and still can’t determine why your ATVs MPH is way off, contact Variety Powersports or an authorized repair facility for the brand, make and model of ATV you own.

Category: ATV Help

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Temperature Sensor Stays On All The Time

Keeping track of engine temperature is very important with an ATV. This job is relegated to the temperature sensor, which operates an indicator light located on the ATV dash control. Occasionally this temperature sensor will stay illuminated for an extended period of time. Usually this means one of two things – either you have a bad sensor or something came unplugged. Here is the process that you should follow if this is happening to you.

    1. The first step is that you’ll need to remove the seat(s) and then take off the center console.
    2. You’ll then need to find the temperature sensor which is located on what would be a passenger side of a vehicle (the right side when looking at the ATV from the rear). Find the carburetor. Once you find the carb, right under will be a gold-fitted sensor plug that is plugged into the motor. Follow the wire that comes off that plug and about 12 inches down that wire will plug into the wiring harness.
    3. Once you’ve verified that the location of the temperature sensor and wiring harness, make sure that it is plugged into the wiring harness. It is very common that it can become unplugged. If it is plugged in, then you probably have a bad sensor due to the fact that it is not reading any temperature off the motor – which will cause the light to remain illuminated for an extended period of time; even if the motor is cold.

If you’ve checked the temperature sensor and found that it’s plugged in, contact Variety Powersports to determine if we have a replacement part that you need. If we don’t have one, we will point you in the right direction as to where to purchase the appropriate parts

Category: ATV Help

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My Unit Won’t Start

When you have a situation where your ATV won’t start, it’s typically due to two reasons; the motor or specifically the starter motor won’t engage, or if engaged, the motor won’t fire. This means that the culprit is electrical or fuel related. To solve this problem, there are a few steps you should take to troubleshoot and then solve the issue.

Check the battery If your engine won’t crank over, it’s most likely an electrical problem. The first thing you should check is the battery and make sure it has a 100% charge. If your battery is fully charged, and your motor wont crank over, make sure to verify that the kill switch is pulled out. If this is not the problem, it’s most likely a damaged starter motor and should be examined or replaced by a professional mechanic.
Check the fuel system If the engine on your ATV will crank over, but won’t fire, it’s going to be either a fuel or electrical related issue. To determine if it’s a fuel problem, you should inspect the fuel line that runs from the gas tank to the fuel pump. You’ll want to make sure that there is nothing in the fuel line or that there are no pinches in the line that might cause fuel flow restriction. If you notice any obstructions, or objects in the fuel line, remove the fuel line and clean. Reattach the fuel line and test the solution.
Check the ignition system Remove your spark plug and put the plug back into the ignition coil, hold the coil with your handle and put the plug onto a ground or the engine, then have someone try to start it; see if the spark plug starts. If the plug does not spark, change your plug with a new spark plug and retest. If it still doesn’t spark, then you most likely have a faulty ignition coil.

These three issues are the most common problems that are found with an ATV that won’t start. If you’ve tried all three of these areas, or simply don’t feel comfortable with this type of maintenance, contact a local ATV mechanic or call our service department at Variety Powersports for recommendations.

Category: ATV Help

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My Unit Bogs at Higher Speeds

A “bog” when under-accelerating is a problem that occurs with many ATV owners; however, it’s not always caused by a major mechanical failure. A bog or the lowering of the RPM band under acceleration is typically caused by an obstruction of fuel or air into the combustion chamber. This area has air or fuel lines that are blocked by debris of some type. If you have been doing a lot of mud or loose sand riding, it’s more likely the air filter is dirty and simply needs to be cleaned. However, if you’ve been casual with your ATV riding, on street or dirt, it’s most likely going to be a problem with the fuel system. Here are a few things you can do to diagnose and fix a bogging problem that is related to the fuel system.

  1. Inspect the fuel line that runs from the gas tank to the fuel pump. You’ll want to make sure that there is nothing in the fuel line or that there are no pinches in the line that might cause fuel flow restriction. If you notice any obstructions, or objects in the fuel line, remove the fuel line and clean. Reattach the fuel line and test the solution.
  2. Inspect the fuel line from the fuel pump to the engine. Once you’ve checked the first fuel line connections from the tank to the pump, you’ll then want to test the connection from the pump to the engine. Remove the fuel line from the engine (either the fuel injector or carb) and place the fuel hose in a clear bottle so you can see the flow of fuel. Turn the key to the on position and press the start button. This will activate the fuel pump. If the volume of fuel is consistent and flowing at a solid rate, the pump is good. If there is very little fuel coming out, the problem is most likely a faulty fuel pump or clogged fuel filter and should be replaced.
Category: ATV Help

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Maintenance

Routine maintenance for any mechanical product is the best insurance policy that any consumer can invest. This definitely applies to the ATVs that we sell at Variety Powersports. All-Terrain Vehicles are built to handle extreme road conditions and take a tremendous amount of abuse. Due to these facts, owners should take proactive measures to create a maintenance schedule that will ensure their ATVs last longer and ride with optimal performance. Here are a few particular items to consider when creating your maintenance program.

    • Oil Most of our ATVs are shipped to customers with oil already inside the engine crank case. However, this is a break in oil that should only be run for about 30 minutes. Once you’ve started your ATV and have run it for about 30 minutes with moderate throttle, you need to change this oil and replace it with new oil. Here are the steps that you should follow to change oil for an ATV sold through Variety Powersports.
      1. Gather the appropriate tools and supplies including a 17mm (in most cases) end wrench, oil collection bucket, rags and replacement oil (follow manufacturer’s specific recommendations however, 10W40 conventional or blend oil is best).
      2. Locate the oil drain bolt in the center section of the engine pan – it is typically a 17mm bolt. With the engine turned OFF, remove the bolt and drain all oil into a collection device.
      3. Locate the oil filler cap, remove the cap and continue to let the oil drain for a few minutes. Once the oil has stopped draining, reinstall the oil drain plug and tighten BEFORE you pour the new oil into the reservoir. Tighten the oil cap after all oil has been inserted into the engine, start the engine and verify that the “oil” light does not come on once the engine has been running for at least one minute.
      4. It’s recommended to replace your oil every 10 to 15 hours of operation.
    • Spark Plug The spark plug is an important part of keeping your unit running in tip-top shape. Every time you start your unit, carbon is burned onto the tip of your spark plug. Eventually carbon can build up and weaken the intensity of the spark you are getting to your motor and cause your unit not to run at 100%. Every so often, maybe every time you change your oil, check your spark plug to see if it needs replacing. Most consumers will replace their spark plugs every other oil change with ATVs. The spark plug you will need is an NGK CR6HSA Plug.
    • Gasoline Premium Unleaded Gasoline should be the only fuel used for ATVs. The small cc-displacement motors can make a tremendous amount of power; however, these engines were manufactured to operate on premium unleaded gasoline. Although the engines will run with regular unleaded gasoline, over a period of time, performance of the engine will decline, carbon buildup on spark plugs will increase and the lifespan of the motor could be compromised. UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES SHOULD YOU EVER RUN RACING GASOLINE or ANY LEAD-BASED ADDITIVES in your ATV. Please contact the manufacturer for any recommendations they would make in regards to fuel stabilizers, especially if you store your ATV for extended periods without operation.
    • Brakes The brake system of an ATV is a critical safety measure that should be included in your routine maintenance program. Make sure you inspect your brakes during every oil change and check a few specific items such as – remove debris, check and inspect brake pad integrity, and inspect for any brake fluid leaking from lines or the master cylinder. Operation of ATVs in sand or compact dirt can cause brakes to wear faster due to friction caused by dirt and sand on the brake rotors. If you notice that your brakes are spongey or the ATV does not stop as well as it used to, it’s probably time to have your brakes replaced.
    • Chain Most ATVs are chain-driven. As such, making sure your chain is tight and adjusted correctly is another important maintenance step. If a chain is loose, it can snap or cause extended damage to your engine, transmission or the drive axel. There are chain adjusters located on the bottom of the swing-arm for you to service the chain. If you are not comfortable with adjusting the chain, contact Variety Powersports and we’ll help you find a service expert.

 

    • Radiator There are two types of cooling systems with the ATVs we sell at Variety Powersports; air cooled and water cooled. When you first get your ATV, if it is one that is liquid cooled, you’ll need to do the following:
      1. Make sure that your radiator fluid is filled up to full. Most of the time it is full, but sometimes it is close to empty.
      2. Anytime you add coolant to your radiator, it needs to have a 50/50 mix of recommended coolant with distilled water.
      3. You should always run your engine for about 10 minutes and let the engine heat up and then refill your radiator unit to ensure the radiator unit is full. When you run your engine, the heat will run out the bubbles that can be in your lines. This is why you will need to add more fluid.

The items listed above represent the majority of service areas recommended for ATVs. It’s also important to routinely check the tires for proper inflation and wear, tighten bolts occasionally and replace fuel and air filters as recommended by the manufacturer. For specifics about recommended maintenance for these items, refer to your ATV owner’s manual that was included in your shipment.

Category: ATV Help

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Starting Instructions

The first time you start a new ATV is arguably the most important. Although each engine has been checked and inspected by the manufacturer before it was shipped, your initial starting will be the first with all components attached and working together. Once you’ve successfully assembled your ATV from Killer Motorsports and have a fully charged battery installed inside the ATV, you need to check a few things before engaging the starter. Here is a generic check list of items you should verify before you start the ATV:

    1. Verify that the battery is connected: It’s common for people to install the battery without properly hooking up cables or making a mistake on attaching a positive lead to a negative terminal. Before you insert a key or begin to start the bike, make sure your battery is correctly installed and all wires are engaged.
    1. Verify the gas tank is full of premium unleaded gasoline: Each ATV sold by Killer Motorsports is recommended to use premium grade (minimum of 89 octane) unleaded gasoline. Make sure you do not use mixed or leaded gasoline or other fuel additives – especially for the initial start.
    1. Insert the Key and turn to ‘on’ position: The ‘on’ position is the first click you’ll feel and hear when you engage the key. Do Not press a starter button until all steps have been completed.
    1. Engage the handlebar brake: Make sure that your emergency handlebar brake is pulled in and locked before starting the ATV. There is a safety device built into the ATV that requires that the brakes be applied in order for the unit to start.
  1. Check the kill switch: Make sure the kill switch is not on the position with the half circle with the “X” inside. The switch needs to be on the empty half-moon circle.

After you’ve successfully completed each step above, and in this order, you’ll be ready to start your bike. While sitting on the bike with your foot on the rear brake pedal; press the start button and hold it down until the engine starts. Once the engine starts, release the starter button. If the engine does not start after engaging the starter for at least 30 seconds, refer to the diagnostic section to begin troubleshooting starting issues or contact our tech support team at Killer Motorsports.

Category: ATV Help

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Assembly

The ATVs that we sell at Killer Motorsports are engineered with high-quality parts and are mostly assembled directly by the manufacturer or our top team in the warehouse. However, in order to keep shipping costs down and to ensure the structural integrity of all moving parts, many of our ATVs require the end customer to put together the final pieces to complete assembly. Listed below are the general assembly instructions for most of the Chinese-built ATVs sold through Killer Motorsports.

  1. Completely Unpack the Crate: Open the top of the shipping crate and remove all of the protective wrapping from the interior of the crate. Once the protective wrapping has been removed, take out all tools, wheels, and racks. Place them in a separate area away from the shipping crate but easily accessible for assembly. Once the crate has been emptied, take the ATV off the bottom of the crate and set it on the ground.
  2. Attach the tires and wheels: To put on the tires you will need to prop up one side of the ATV with a jack stand and mount one side of tires/wheels at a time. You can also use a multipurpose jack stand to hoist the ATV up completely if you’d like. Once the first side tires and wheels have been installed, complete installation of the remaining two wheels.
  3. Install support racks: Once the tires have been mounted, and properly torqued to the manufacturers recommended pressure, you should then attach any racks if your ATV includes them. The bolts and mounting hardware will be included in the tool kit if applicable.
  4. Install Handlebars: Most of the ATVs sold at Killer Motorsports will have the handlebars packaged inside the crate and need to be assembled. To accomplish, unpack the handlebar mounts that are located in the tool and assembly kit. Follow the specific directions supplied by the manufacturer for proper mounting of the handlebars. *NOTE: Make sure to properly center and tighten handlebars to the manufacturers recommended pressure for safety and better riding experience.
  5. Install Battery: As each ATV manufacturer is unique, the installation instructions for batteries will be specific to the brand and model of your ATV. Follow the directions supplied for proper battery installation steps. *NOTE: It is recommended that prior to use, that you charge the battery for a minimum of 24 hours. Failure to complete this important step may result in inefficient operation and charging of the battery or premature wear.
  6. Add Lubricants as recommended by the manufacturer: Follow the instructions provided for adding lubricants including oil and coolants (if needed).

If you discover that there are any parts missing from the crate in step one of the assembly listed above, please contact the sales and support team at Killer Motorsports before moving on with additional assembly.

Category: ATV Help

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General Help

Vehicle and Parts Warranty Information

With ANY unit that is shipped in the crate, you will always need to make sure you do a full maintenance PDI on your vehicle to ensure fully working condition. AKA, Checking the bolts, fixing any defects, assembly, etc. Most dealerships charge anywhere from $100 to $500 to do this for you, so you never realize anything was ever wrong. In reality, the dealership checked all the bolts, cleaned the carb, replaced any factory defects, changed the spark plugs, oil, filled the unit with gas, maybe went through a battery or two. This is what needs to be done withany shipped crated unit because you have avoided this charge by getting a crated unit shipped to you. For a list of what might need to be checked before starting your unit, please visit our maintenance section. If you do the assembly yourself, you accept all liability of defects for the unit and waive your warranty rights. In order not to avoid losing your warranty, you must have a licensed mechanic put your unit together and save the receipt paperwork that will be submitted with the documentation. If you are a licensed mechanic, you must provide a copy of your license when submitting the paperwork.
The 12-Month manufacturer warranty (and extended optional warranties) is provided by the manufacture, NOT Variety Powersports, and starts from the date the product is received. Variety Powersports will handle all warranty claims between the manufacture and the customer. Variety Powersports is NOT responsible for any damages or defects and customer agrees to follow all manufacture procedures and policies for filing a claim to warranty a product.
To file a claim, you first will need to diagnose which part you need; then, in the warranty section, click on File a Claim. This is the ONLY way to file a Warranty Claim. The manufacturer is the SOLE determiner if something is to be covered under warranty because any damages or defects is the manufacturer’s responsibility, NOT Variety Powersports. The 12-Month manufacturer warranty (and extended optional warranties) is through the manufacturer and is simple.

  • No Wear and Tear items are covered under warranty; see the full list below. After 30 days, only the motor is covered under manufacturer warranty for a period of 2 additional months, unless an extended warranty is purchased at time of initial purchase. Transmissions are not covered under warranty.
  • All warranty parts must be mailed in by the customer for replacement. The manufacturer will ONLY cover shipping back to the customer. Variety Powersports is NOT responsible for ANY shipping to and from the customer and the manufacturer.
  • The warranty does not cover vehicles that are raced, modified, and not properly maintained.

Every person who buys a vehicle from Variety Powersports needs to read the maintenance section provided by Variety Powersports. This will explain all the maintenance that needs to be performed and will explain how to keep your vehicle in tip-top shape.
All products sold by Variety Powersports, Inc. are guaranteed to be fully functional or in working order at the time of sale and delivery by the manufacturer. If the product received is not in working order or is damaged at the time of purchase or delivery, make a note of the damages to the shipper or carrier and file a warranty claim with Variety Powersports within 48 hours of delivery.

Category: General Help

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Warranty Claim Circumstances and Parts

Our warranty is in effect ONLY under these circumstances:

  • When your unit arrives, you need to do a delivery inspection with the driver to inspect your unit for any shipping damages. If there are any damages, note the damages, sign for the deliver on the delivery receipt, and make the driver sign it as well. This is required so we can file a shipping claim for any damaged fenders, etc. Do NOT refuse the unit, this will hinder our ability to help you because you will be responsible for the returned shipping charges and any resending charges. Nine times out of 10 there, the issue simply is just a fender that is needing replacement, NOT the actual unit because they are packaged very well.
  • If you need to file a shipping claim, do so under our file-a-claim within 48 hours of delivery, this time frame is required by the shipping companies for claim acceptance. We will file the claim and send any parts within 4-8 business days.
  • Uncrate your unit and assemble it. This should be done by a factory mechanic to ensure proper assembly. Read our warranty policy.
  • If you have any issues starting your unit, go to our FAQ section and read about diagnosis issues, Ninety-nine percent of the time, it’s always something simple.
  • If you find that there is a defective part, then take a picture of the part and file a claim. You will need the picture of the part for us to replace it, this per the factory warranty policies. Usually parts are sent out the in a couple of business days, in most cases

The only parts your warranty excludes are:

  • Tires
  • Filters
  • Gaskets
  • Batteries
  • Lubricants
  • Plastics
  • Spark Plugs
  • Hoses
  • Crash, Accident (Operator Error)
  • Unauthorized Outside Repair
  • Clutches or Transmissions
  • Grips, handlebars, etc.

The warranty is manufacturer defect, meaning the product could not have been broken due to customer use or abuse.

Category: General Help

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Step By Step Instructions from when you purchase your unit to when you start riding.

  • When your unit arrives, you need to do a delivery inspection with the driver to inspect your unit for any shipping damages. If there are any damages, note the damages, sign for the deliver on the delivery receipt, and make the driver sign it as well. This is required so we can file a shipping claim for any damaged fenders, etc. Do NOT refuse the unit, this will hinder our ability to help you because you will be responsible for the returned shipping charges and any resending charges.Nine times out of 10 there, the issue simply is just a fender that is needing replacement, NOT the actual unit because they are packaged very well.
  • If you need to file a shipping claim, do so under our file-a-claim within 48 hours of delivery, this time frame is required by the shipping companies for claim acceptance. We will file the claim and send any parts the following day.
  • Uncrate your unit and assemble it. This should be done by a factory mechanic to ensure proper assembly. Read our warranty policy below.
  • If you have any issues starting your unit, go to our maintenance section below and read about diagnosis issues, Ninety-nine percent of the time, it’s always something simple.
  • If you find that there is a defective part, then take a picture of the part and file a claim. You will need the picture of the part for us to replace it, this per the factory warranty policies. Usually parts are sent out the next business day, in most cases
Category: General Help

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Gokart Help

Off Road Go kart PDI Maintenance Instruction Video

Category: Gokart Help

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My Go Kart is Leaking Gas Into the Intake

It’s very rare that this situation will occur, but occasionally we receive phone calls or emails when the owners go kart is having problems running. Most of the time, starting issues on a go kart is caused by problems with the fuel or electric system. In this case, gasoline is leaking into the intake manifold which causes a rich situation and eventually causes the motor to shut off or bog.

The problem with gasoline flowing or dripping into the intake manifold is caused by float bowls in the carburetor being stuck or that the carburetor has a clogged jet. In order to repair this issue, you’ll have to complete a full carburetor clean. To access this process, please review the section below on how to clean a carburetor, and watch our video that will walk you step by step on how to complete this process.

Posted below are instructions on how to clean your carburetor for go karts sold through Variety Powersports:

  1. To clean your carburetor you will need to take the carb off the go kart. Typically there are 2 to 4 screws on the bottom of the carb you will need to remove.
  2. After removal, make sure you have clear access to the float bowl and the carb jets. The jets look like two gold screws with holes in them. Unscrew the carb jets and make sure nothing is clogging them. Your float is usually white and you will need to make sure it moves up and down freely.
  3. Clean the bottom inside of your carburetor and the bottom of the bowl with carb cleaner and this should remove most of the debris.
  4. Reassemble your carburetor, reattach to the go kart, reconnect all hoses and cables and test fire your scooter to verify there are no leaks.

This video below shows you the inner workings of the typical carburetor that is used on most of the go karts we sell at Variety Powersports. Review this video to see what the parts look like and for tips on cleaning and adjusting your carburetor. However, it’s also important to remember to ONLY use premium gasoline; especially after cleaning your carb.

Category: Gokart Help

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Temperature sensor stays on all the time

Most of the go karts sold through Variety Powersports are water cooled, which allows them to run at a desired operating temperature all the time. However, sometimes the temperature sensor will stay on, even though there is not a problem with the coolant or engine temperature. This is usually a sign that there is an issue with the sensor or that the sensor line has come unplugged. To fix this issue, follow the guidelines posted below.
Remove seats: In order to inspect this issue, you need to remove your two seats and then take off the center console. Once that is removed, you will need to be on the passenger side of the unit and find the carb.
Find the sensor plug: Right under the carburetor will be a gold-fitted sensor plug that is plugged into the motor. Follow the wire that comes off that plug and about 12 inches down that wire it will plug into the wiring harness. Make sure that it is plugged into the wiring harness. It is very common that it can become unplugged.
If the sensor is plugged in, it is likely that you have a damaged sensor which will can be ordered through Variety Powersports. Contact Variety Powersports if you experience this issue with your go kart and one of our sales professionals will help you solve the problem.

Category: Gokart Help

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Go Kart Assembly Guide

Most go karts are nearly fully assembled when they are shipped to customers in the United States. However, there are a few small assembly procedures that need to be completed by the customer in many cases. The installation guide posted below is for the Hammerhead GTS150 Go Kart. However, most of the go karts sold through Variety Powersports have nearly identical assembly instructions. Use this as a reference but always follow the manufacturers recommended steps for assembly and proper break in procedures.

  1. Completely unpack the crate: The first step is to remove all objects from inside the crate. This will include the go kart, additional parts, instruction manuals, and any support tools and equipment inside the box.
  2. Organize all contents on the floor: It’s a good idea to keep all components that were inside the crate organized in sections outside the crate. This will help you find parts easily and reduce the potential of misplacing parts.
  3. Prop the go kart with a lift of sturdy and balanced stand
  4. Install suspension: Remove the shock prop rods and replace them with the rear shock. Tighten all bolts. Then, mount the front shocks in the front A-arms. Place the bottom of the front shock into the front A-arm control. Tighten all bolts.
  5. Install all wheels and tighten bolts to recommended torque pressure.
  6. Install steering wheel and place steering wheel cap in the insert when completed.
  7. Install the roll cage.
  8. Install the gas tank, mount fuel and air lines as directed on instruction sheet.
  9. Install reflectors and side fenders.
  10. Mount the seats to the frame and put the straps around the seats
  11. Add recommended gasoline to the fuel tank, fill all fluids and retighten all bolts a final time.

Once you’ve completed the installation process, make sure you triple check all bolts for tightness and that all fuel and air lines are secure. Complete the start-up procedure as recommended by your manufacturer and also complete the break-in process as recommended. If you have any issues during your assembly or have unpacked your crate and are missing any parts, please contact Variety Powersports before proceeding with the assembly.

Category: Gokart Help

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Break In and Maintenance

Proper assembly and break in and routine service will ensure a long life for your go kart. In many cases, the go kart will have most of the parts put together for you before it arrives to your home. When you first get your go kart, if it is one that is liquid cooled, make sure that your radiator fluid is filled up to full. Your go kart needs to have a 50/50 mix of recommended radiator fluid with distilled water. So, make sure you mix it properly before you fill it.

Once all fluids have been checked and the go kart if fully assembled, you’ll want to initially start your go kart engine. You should always run your engine for about 10 minutes and let the engine heat up and then refill your radiator unit to ensure the radiator unit is full. As the engine runs, coolant will fill the tubes and inside the motor. Also, when you run your engine, the heat will run out the bubbles that can be in your lines. This is why you will need to add more fluid.

Proper tips for the Break-In Period: You’ll need to take it easy on your unit for about 30 consecutive minutes. Just do easy riding and resist the urge to apply full throttle or ride the go kart rough. The gaskets need to heat seal and if you “hammer down” on your unit when you first get it, you’re engine will have an enormous amount of pressure build up and you can blow a gasket, which may void any warranties.

After running your go kart for about 30 minutes, you should retighten all bolts and nuts. A good idea is to purchase some blue Loctite and apply on all major bolts, especially suspension parts that hold engine components together. This will help to protect the bolts from coming loose at the wrong time. It’s also recommended to tighten every bolt after your first three rides.

Maintenance Tips: You will want to change your oil about once every 10 hours of riding. The unit will hold 2.25 quarts of oil. We recommend running 4-Stroke 10w40 oil. After about an hour of riding, you’ll want to check your chain and make sure that it is tight. Usually within the first hour of riding, the chain will loosen and you’ll need to tighten it sometimes. The chain adjusters are located on the axle; adjust these until the chain is tight. Check this every so often after you finish riding to ensure the chain is tight. A loose chain can jump the sprocket, break teeth on the sprocket, and if it breaks then it can snap to your engine and bust your case.

As long as you stay on top of replacing motor oil, checking coolant fluid and adjusting your chain, the go kart should work fantastic for many years. Obviously, make sure to replace your battery and tires as needed. If you need any assistance or have questions about go kart accessories and replacement parts, contact our sales team at Variety Powersports.

Category: Gokart Help

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Full Throttle Bogs Down Go Kart

One of the most frustrating situations for a go kart owner is when they hit the gas to full throttle and the engine bogs down. Believe it or not, this is a very common problem, especially when people travel to higher altitudes. If you live at higher altitudes, you’ll have to change the jets inside the carburetor. It’s best to contact a local go kart mechanic for advice on fuel set ups at higher altitudes.

When living at sea level or below 3,000 feet, the issue is usually caused by an issue with the air/fuel mixture. In this case, when you apply full throttle, too much fuel enters the combustion chamber and the spark simply can’t burn the fuel. This is a simple fix. Listed below are the steps you need to complete to make this adjustment to the carburetor.

Remove the carb: The most common way to take the carburetor off the go kart is to remove 2 bolts off the top of the carb and take the top off carefully because it is spring loaded.

Remove the top and the spring, then remove the slide in the carburetor.

Adjust the bleed needle: Put the needle through the slide. Make sure you don’t lose the clip that secures the needle. There will be a c-clip on the needle; move this down one notch. This is adjusting the fuel/air mixture. As you move the c-clip down, it leans the motor out, moving the c-clip up will richen the motor with more fuel.

Once you are finished, reassemble everything and test the go kart to see if this fixed the bogging issue. If the problem is worse, you’ll have to adjust the bleed needle in the other direction, however, this is very uncommon. If it does not clean up, contact a local mechanic for professional help or call our team at Variety Powersorts for technical support.

Category: Gokart Help

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My Unit Won’t Start

A common problem we receive here at Variety Powersports is when customers have issues starting their go kart. Whether it’s fuel or electronic related, many of the typical starting issues are easy to solve. Listed below are a few of our most common solutions that you can check at home if you’re having difficulty staring your go kart.

    1. Check power and fuel: When a go kart engine won’t start, it is usually because of a lack of electricity or fuel restrictions. The first thing you’ll want to do is check your battery and make sure it has a 100 percent charge. The next quick step is to check your gas to make sure you have flow to the engine. If after this step you determine that there is power in the battery and fuel flowing through the lines, you’ll need to inspect a few specific parts.
      • Remove your spark plug and put the plug back into the ignition coil, hold the coil with your handle, and put the plug onto a ground or the engine, then have someone try and start it. If the spark plug doesn’t fire, change your plug. If after this step the spark plug still does not spark, then you have a faulty ignition coil.
      • Next, you will need to make sure you have gas going to the carb. Take the gas hose off the carb and make sure gas flows from the lines. You might have to try and start the engine to see gasoline flowing if you have a suction-type petcock. If gas is getting to the carb, then try to start your unit for about 30 seconds. Once you are done with that, take the spark plug out and see if it is wet. If so, then the issue is not fuel-related. If it is not wet, then you need to do a carburetor clean and rebuild. See the section about carb maintenance here on Variety Powersports for further instructions.
    2. Check kill switch: If you’ve completed the above steps to verify that there is battery life and fuel flowing, the next step you’ll want to inspect is the kill switch or an issue with the ignition switch. Sometimes the ignition switch on a go kart can go bad, especially if it’s exposed to outdoor elements for extended period of time. In order to complete this, you’ll need to take it apart and check for power flowing to the switch with a battery tester. If you do not feel comfortable with this type of service, contact a local mechanic to check this for you or call our service department for assistance.
  1. Check ground wire connections: Finally, if you’ve verified that fuel and electricity is flowing and your kill switch has not failed or is stuck on, you should check your ground wire connections. To complete this, find your battery’s negative terminal. There should be a wire that attaches to the frame. Make sure that wire is not frayed or cut. If it is, repair it and reattach.

Most of the time, finding the reason why your go kart won’t start is rather simple. However, if you’ve completed all of these steps and still can’t diagnose the precise issue, you’ll want to contact Variety Powersports for further recommendations.

Category: Gokart Help

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Pit Bike Help

I can’t get spark on my pit bike

In order for fuel vapor to ignite, there needs to be an efficient flow of electricity to activate the spark plug. However, from time to time, the current is blocked, either due to a problem with the ignition system or the spark plug itself. Below are the steps to take in order to fix the issue of a spark not igniting inside the combustion chamber.

  1. Remove the spark plug from the cylinder block.
  2. Place the loose spark plug back in the ignition coil, then hold the ignition coil with the plug inserted and touch the spark plug to a bolt on the engine block.
  3. Attempt to kick start the pit bike and see if you notice a spark at the end of the spark plug as you apply pressure to the starter. If you have an automatic starter, you can accomplish the same task by pressing the start button.
  4. If you don’t see a spark coming from the plug, replace the old plug with a new spark plug (recommended for your pit bike) and retest. This test will determine whether or not the missing spark issue is related to the spark plug or other electrical component. If you’ve completed this test and still don’t see a spark coming from the plug, double check all electrical connections including the plug wire connection to the ignition coil, kill switch or cdi. Repeat this step after checking each individual component. If still no spark, proceed to the next step.
  5. If you’ve checked all connections, tried multiple spark plugs and don’t notice a spark coming from the plug that is placed next to a metal bolt, unplug the kill switch from the electrical box on the pit bike and reattempt.

If after the above steps you still don’t notice a spark coming from the plug, it’s likely one of three component failures – the cdi, ignition coil or the starter assembly. At this point, we’d recommend calling our support team and finding an authorized pit bike mechanic to fix the issue.

Category: Pit Bike Help

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Normal Maintenance

Normal scheduled maintenance for a pit bike can extend the lifecycle of your new toy considerably. From oil changes to replacing air filters on a timely basis, investing time in completing some of the suggested maintenance tips below can significantly improve performance and enjoyment of any pit bike. All the information provided below is a simple starting point of a normal maintenance program, but does not guarantee that mechanical breakdown won’t occur. If you have additional questions about the service tips listed below, feel free to contact our customer service department.

Understanding the Break-In Period

The break in period of a pit bike is typically your first three rides which individually last no longer than 10 minutes for each ride. Once this process is complete, we recommend making a few changes to your pit bike and completing a few recommended maintenance check-ups to ensure all moving parts are property tightened and ready for full use.

    1. Tighten the spokes. To do this, from the valve stem, tighten every third spoke. Please refer to the above image for location of the spokes.
    2. Tighten your chain. After your first 3 initial rides, your chain is going to stretch. It is important to keep your chain tightened to the appropriate tension to avoid chain malfunction while riding. You will also want to check your chain every time before you ride.
  1. Replace your Spark Plugs. Even though the spark plugs that come with our bikes are decent, you will always want to upgrade your spark plug to a NKG Spark Plug (Part number CR7HSA Plug BX/10NKG). Doing this will greatly improve your horsepower and the performance of the bike with little cost to you.
  2. Apply fork oil to the front forks. Typically after the first rides, front forks can be made stiffer by adding fork oil. To do this, visit your local pit bike dealer or contact Variety Powersports to inquire as to which brand or type of fork oil is best for your specific pit bike.
  3. Adjust your rear shock for comfort. The rear shock can be loosened or tightened at the rear spring. Although not required, it’s a good idea to understand this fact so you can fine-tune your suspension to match your comfort level and riding preference.
  4. Adjust handlebars for safety. The handlebars are also adjustable so that you can pick a riding position that makes it easier to steer your pit bike but also for easy application of throttle and brake handles for safety.
  5. Fill up gas with Premium Unleaded Gasoline. Pit bikes sold from Variety Powersports are performance engines that require a cleaner grade of gasoline. It’s recommended to run a minimum of 89 octane to 91 octane unleaded gasoline. It is NOT recommended to add fuel additives or performance boosters as that can lead to premature wear and tear of valve train components. DO NOT USE MIXED GASOLINE typically used for two-stroke motors.

As with any product we sell at Variety Powersports, your complete satisfaction is our primary goal. The above maintenance tips will help you fine-tune your pit bike to your personal standards, but also provide you with a baseline to extend parts life and enjoy your pit bike for years.

Category: Pit Bike Help

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Pre-Riding Checklist for Pitster Pro

Buying a new Bike and uncrating it is exciting for anyone. However, like any other mechanical piece, it’s always a good idea to complete a full safety inspection before starting the motor and taking it for a test spin. Noted below is a checklist we’ve created, along with the below infographic that will provide you with a step by step list of items to verify before you start the bike.

    1. Check all fluid levels including; brake fluid and engine oil. We recommend using a full synthetic engine oil after the engine break in process. It’s also a good idea to change brake fluid to DOT 4 or better brake fluid after the break in process.
    1. Check all the nuts and bolts to make sure everyone is tight.
  1. Although we recommend applying Loctite to all the nuts of your new machine, there are a few spots that should specifically be checked. Pay special attention to the following areas:
    • The master cylinder, axel nut and brake pedal bolts
    • Sub frame, chain slider and chain roller bolts
    • Fuel tank, triple clamp bolts and all bar riser bolts
    • Caliper bolts, rotor and spacer bolts
    • All rotor and brake spacer bolts, front brake caliper and fork guard bolts
    • Sprocket bolts and chain guide bolts
  2. Oil the air filter with high quality foam filter oil. Note: it’s important to keep your air filter properly cleaned and oiled to keep your engine running strong.

If during any phase of this checklist you notice something “just not right” with any part of the pit bike, feel free to contact our customer service department at Killer Motorsports and speak with one of our service technicians.

Category: Pit Bike Help

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My Breaks Are Having Trouble

Problems with brakes, whether it’s the front, back or both is not a minor issue that should be put on the back burner. Besides being an alert pit bike rider, fully functional brakes are the primary safety device of any pit bike. If you notice a problem with your brakes being soft or taking time to engage when the brake pedals or handles are depressed, there are a few steps you should take to solve the problems often associated with low brake pressure.

  1. Check the brake lines fittings for any leaking brake fluid. Most brake pressure problems occur when air enters the brake lines or if fluid is lost through the brake system. By visually checking the brake lines, each connection and surrounding area for signs of leaking fluid, you can minimize your search for the problem.
  2. If you don’t instantly notice a loose fitting or signs of brake fluid leaks, clean all lines and fittings with carb cleaner or degreaser product. Make sure all lines are completely dry then apply the brakes and see if you can find any signs of leaks coming from the brake lines or fittings.
  3. Next, check your brake fluid reservoir and check your brake fluid level. If the level is below the “fill” line, fill the brake reservoir with recommended brake fluid for your brand of pit bike. Close the brake fluid cap, test your brake pressure again.
  4. If you’ve followed the first three steps and still don’t see any leaking fluid, it’s probable that your brakes need to be bled. To bleed your brakes, you’ll need an 8mm opened-end wrench, and a collection can of some sort to place next to the bleed screws on the brakes. Note: If you’re not comfortable with bleeding brakes, please have a professional mechanic accomplish this for you.
  5. To begin the brake bleeding, push down on your brake pedal or handle until you have pressure, and hold. Then loosen the bleed bolt and let the air out of the lines and then tighten the bolt quickly. Pump the brakes and see if you have pressure again. If not, try this a few more times. You also probably need to put more fluid in your lines after completing the brake bleed. Check the level. If it is low, put more fluid in and then bleed the brakes again. Continue this process until your brake pedal pressure has returned to the way it was before you noticed the soft pedal condition.

If you’ve checked and repaired any leaking brake lines, bled the brake system and still have issues with soft brakes, it’s likely that the problem is with the brake pads or brake caliper and should be replaced by a certified pit bike mechanic.

Category: Pit Bike Help

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My bike is sputtering whenever I give it full throttle

The problem of having an engine “sputter” is typically caused by a fuel system issue. For pit bikes with smaller cc displacement engines, in order for a cylinder to fire efficiently, three separate components must work together; the fuel delivery system (carburetor), the ignition coil and wires and the spark plug. Typically with most pit bikes, the problem is going to be with the spark plug or the carburetor; with the fuel system being the primary culprit.

The first step we recommend is to check the efficiency of the spark plug. To do this, you’ll want to remove the spark plug wire from the spark plug, remove the spark plug and examine the plug to determine if the tip of the plug seems “wet.” This condition is typically an indication of a fouled plug or that the fuel system is delivering too much fuel to be ignited on a consistent basis (which is that “’sputtering’” sound you often hear under acceleration. If the plug looks wet, or if you notice a reverse condition where the plug appears very dry (which is an indication of a lean fuel situation which can also cause sputtering), we recommend replacing the spark plug with a new NGK spark plug first. The spark plug is a CR6HSA or CR7HSA NGK.

The next thing that you want to check and clean the carburetor. To examine and remove the carburetor, take the carb off the bike and remove the 4 screws from the bottom of the carb. At this point, you’ll see two gold screws. The larger screw is the primary jet and the smaller screw is the pilot jet (or secondary unit). While ensuring you are wearing safety glasses, apply carb cleaner vigorously through the holes of the jets and through the entire carburetor. You should then use compressed air to blow any gunk or debris that could be stuck in the jets or the bottom bowl inside the carburetor.

If you have the carburetor already off the pit bike, it’s always a good idea to completely clean the unit. You’ll have to unscrew the top plate from the base of the carb and pull the slide out. Whenever you pull the slide out, take the needle out of the slide and move the “c” clip on the needle up one slot. Follow the steps above for cleaning all components inside the carburetor and reassemble. Put everything back together and check the performance of your pit bike and the ‘sputtering’ issue. If the issue continues, it’s possible that the carburetor is defective.

Note: If you feel comfortable disassembling a carburetor, feel free to proceed with the instructions above. However, if you don’t feel comfortable, contact our technical team and we can help you through the process or recommend a local mechanic.

Category: Pit Bike Help

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Scooter Help

My Scooter Is Leaking Gas into the Intake

The problem of having gasoline leaking into the intake valve, causing a rich or flooding situation is for a scooter is one that shouldn’t be avoided. In fact, anytime you experience problems with fuel, the issue should always be discovered and a solution provided to reduce the potential of further damage to the engine or void any warranties.

For the most part, this problem is caused by a carburetor that has a float that is stuck or a clogged jet that is continually flowing fuel to the intake valve. If this is the case, simply cleaning a carburetor can be an easy solution.

Posted below are instructions on how to clean your carburetor for most scooters sold through Variety Powersports:

To clean your carburetor you will need to take the carb off the scooter. Typically there are 2 to 4 screws on the bottom of the carb you will need to remove.

After removal, make sure you have clear access to the float bowl and the carb jets. The jets look like two gold screws with holes in them. Unscrew the carb jets and make sure nothing is clogging them. Your float is usually white and you will need to make sure it moves up and down freely.

Clean the bottom inside of your carburetor and the bottom of the bowl with carb cleaner and this should remove most of the debris.

Reassemble your carburetor, reattach to the scooter, reconnect all hoses and cables and test fire your scooter to verify there are no leaks.
This video below shows you the inner workings of the typical carburetor that is used on most of the scooters we sell at Variety Powersports. Review this video to see what the parts look like and for tips on cleaning and adjusting your carburetor. However, it’s also important to remember to ONLY use premium gasoline; especially after cleaning your carb.

Category: Scooter Help

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My Unit Just Dies When I Come To A Stop, But Everything Checks Out

Nothing is worse than trying to diagnose a problem when you’ve pretty much checked everything. This situation gets worse when your scooter simply dies and stops running when you come to a stop. Typically this situation is caused by two things:
A fuel delivery problem

An electrical problem

If you have done everything from checking gasoline, cleaning the carb to examining the spark plug wires, plugs themselves and ignition system, the chances are that the problem is related to the valves needing to be adjusted. Typically cylinder valves can become loose on a scooter motor after an extended period of operation. In fact, in most cases, cylinder head valves don’t require any adjustment until they’ve reached 1,000 miles of operation.

If you’ve come to the point where you can’t find any other issues with fuel or electrical that may be causing your engine to quit running when you come to a stop, it’s quite possible that the valves are loose, causing a ‘flooding’ situation of fuel, or the reverse, where they are too tight and restricting the flow of air/fuel or exhaust, causing the engine to misfire and quit running. If this is the situation, contact our sales team to get the proper adjustment clearance measurements for the brand of scooter you have so you can have the valves adjusted professionally; or if you’re comfortable, doing this on your own.

Category: Scooter Help

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Temperature sensor stays on all the time

The temperature sensor is a critical warning indicator that alerts you to a potential problem with your scooter from Variety Powersports. For time to time, this warning light will appear to stay illuminated, bringing up the obvious question; ‘is it the sensor or a major problem with the engine’. Due to the importance of the temperature sensor, it’s important to find out why this is happening so you can fix the issue and potentially save thousands of dollars in repairs. Here is a list of things to check that will help you discover if it’s just a minor issue, or the signs of a major problem.

Remove the Seat: The first step is to check the actual sensor to see if something came unplugged or if the sensor is faulty. To check this, you need to remove your two seats and then take off the center console.

Find the Carb: Once the seat is removed, you will need to be on the passenger side of the unit to find the carburetor.

Located the gold sensor: Directly under the carburetor will be a gold-fitted sensor plug that is plugged into the motor. Follow the wire that comes off that plug and about 12 inches down it will plug into the wiring harness. Make sure that it is plugged into the wiring harness. It is very common that it can become unplugged. If it is plugged in properly, then you probably have a bad sensor that illuminates frequently because it is not reading any temperature off the motor.

If you’ve checked the sensor and fixed it, and the temperature sensor still illuminates frequently, you should call our sales and support team at Variety Powersports quickly, so we can help you with the problem or help find a local certified mechanic who can diagnose and fix the issue for you.

Category: Scooter Help

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How Do I Adjust My Valves?

Adjusting the valves on a scooter is not an easy task, nor should it be completed without the proper tools or experience. For those who feel comfortable with this job, you’ll probably know that each manufacturer has specific rules and guidelines on valve lash (clearance) and how they should be set. Noted below is a basic instructional list of steps that you should complete when adjusting the valves of a scooter purchased through Variety Powersports. If you have any hesitation on completing this job 100% accurately, please STOP and have an experienced mechanic complete valve adjustment as needed.

First, a few indicators on when valves should be adjusted. When a valve’s clearance from the rocker arm and valve stem is too large, the valve doesn’t open up fully (and you’ll probably hear a clicking or knocking sound). Conversely, if the valve lash is too tight, the valve won’t close or open fully or correctly, leading to poor engine performance and in some cases, compression or exhaust issues that can cause major mechanical damage. For those who feel comfortable moving forward, noted below are a few important steps to follow about adjusting valves on a scooter motor.

    1. Always Adjust Valves Cold: A common rule in setting valve clearance is making sure that the engine is cold. If the engine valve is adjusted when hot, it will close or loosen when the engine is cold and vice versa.
    1. Place Scooter on a stand for stability and security
    1. Take valve cover off
    1. Find TDC: Place a wrench on the nut that attaches to the fan (if there is one) or the crank and rotate the engine until you reach Top Dead Center. If you look at the flywheel of a scooter motor, sometimes TDC will be marked with an “X” or “T” or they will be indicated on the outside of a cam-sprocket .
  1. Adjust Intake and Exhaust Valves: Once you’re cylinder is at TDC, you can adjust the valves. It’s always a good idea to start with intake and then finish with exhaust. Contact your engine manufacturer to receive the correct valve lash settings for intake valves and exhaust as most likely they will be unique and different per each scooter manufacturer. Again, you should know how to adjust valves if you’re trying this on your own, so we won’t get into the specifics about this process.

Adjusting valves should only be completed after contacting the sales and technical team at Variety Powersports to ensure any warranties or other issues are handled appropriately. Our technical team can help you with the proper valve adjustment settings and also help you find a local mechanic that is certified to work on your specific brand of scooter if needed.

Category: Scooter Help

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Whenever I am at Full Throttle My Engine Bogs Out

The problem of an engine bogging out is commonly caused by inefficiency of fuel or air flow or ignition to the carburetor. With a newer scooter, this could be caused of a few situations and one of them could be caused by driver error. When you’re under full throttle, the governor will not allow you to get any more power – and will result in a situation where the engine appears to bog down. However, if the issue is not with the governor, it may be directly related to other mechanical issues that can be diagnosed and fixed. Here are a few items to check along with a solution to fix them in many cases.

    1. Check the Air Filter: The most common reason why an engine bogs out under acceleration is because the air/fuel mixture is ‘dirty’ or inefficient. If the air filter is clogged or has a lot of dirt in it, it could be bogging down the engine. Clean the air filter and see if the problem goes away.
    1. Check the Carb: If your scooter is new, you might need to adjust the needle on the carburetor slide. To do this, find the carburetor through the panel under the seat. Take the screws out of the top of the carburetor, which will expose the carb. Pull the slide out with the needle attached. There are 3 notches on the needle. If the scooter is stock, this will be in the middle. Move the needle up to the top slot and put it back together. If your scooter is used, then still check the needle, but take the carb out, unscrew the bottom of the carb, and clean the bowl.
    1. Clean the Carb: Sometimes dirt or filth can get in the carb and clog the main jet or pilot and will not allow fuel to flow properly. If this happens, you’ll need to clean the carburetor to remove any ‘gunk’ or obstructions that are causing the bogging situation. Sometimes using carb cleaner to spray into the carb throttle body is easy enough, while other times complete disassembly and cleaning is the best solution.

Variety Powersports sells a huge selection of new fuel filters and air filters available for the scooters we sell. Replacing these items on a consistent and routine basis can reduce potential problems like having the engine bog at higher speeds or under acceleration.

Category: Scooter Help

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How do I Clean My Air Filter?

The air filter is considered the lungs of any combustion engine. For this reason, it’s vital to ensure that it remains clean and serviceable as often as possible. For a scooter sold through Variety Powersports, a clean and efficient air filter can mean the difference between smooth and long-lasting operation, and having a scooter that eventually breaks down.

Cleaning an air filter on a scooter is a simple process as indicated below.

First – remove the air filter. On the left side of the engine is an air intake box. It usually has 6 screws. Take the screws out and the filter will be exposed. Remove the filter and place on a work bench or clear space that allows you plenty of space to clean the filter.

Clean the filter with water or Compressed Air: There are two ways to clean an air filter for a scooter; either though water or compressed air. If you wash the filter with water it is critical that you let it dry completely before placing it back onto the scooter. Cleaning an air filter with compressed air is recommended if you’re in a hurry and want to complete the job without delays.

Replace the air filter: Eventually, your air filter will wear out, regardless of how often you wash or clean it. It’s a good idea to replace your air filter every 3,000 miles or every six oil changes. When you need to buy a new air filter, Variety Powersports has multiple in stock and available at very affordable pricing. Visit this page to check out our inventory of all replacement parts for scooters.

Category: Scooter Help

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I Hear Some Slight Knocking in My Engine

The four stroke engines that power today’s scooters sold through Variety Powersports are engineered to run smooth, efficient and most importantly – without knocking. Anytime you hear a knocking or ticking sound coming from an internal combustion engine, it’s typically not a good thing. The cause of the ticking or knocking sound can be minor or the sign of a major mechanical issue; that could lead to complete engine failure. Never the less, a slight knocking sound is typically due to a lubrication situation. As such, here are a few tips for diagnosing this problem.

Check your oil level: When you hear a slight knock or repeated tick every time the engine rotates, it’s commonly due to low oil levels or old oil that is not properly lubricating the engine components inside the cylinder head. The first thing you should do is to check your oil level if you’ve recently changed oil. If it is low, add oil slowly and in small increments until the oil level is full. Start the engine and see if the tick goes away.

Change the Oil: If you’ve check the oil level and added some and the tick or knock is still occurring, you need to change the oil and add new 10W40 conventional oil. Add the recommended level of engine oil, check the level to ensure it is full, and again, try to start the engine to see if the knock goes away. If the knocking still exists, the problem is internal with the engine and should be fixed as soon as possible before operating the scooter further.

Verify your gasoline usage: Sometimes scooter owners will use lower grade unleaded gasoline in their scooters. However, we strongly recommend using premium unleaded gasoline, as lower grades have less octane which can produce higher levels of carbon and poor engine efficiency. The knocking could be caused by this factor. If this is the situation, empty your fuel tank, fill up with premium unleaded gasoline and run the scooter for a while to see if the knock goes away.
If you’ve completed the above steps and still notice the knocking sound, or if the knocking sound gets louder and more pronounced, it’s possible that you have loose valves or something wrong with the internal engine components. Call our technicians at Variety Powersports for recommendations as to how to address this situation, but make sure to stop driving or operating your scooter to prevent additional damage.

Category: Scooter Help

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My Speedometer is Not Working Correctly

The problem of a speedometer not working on a scooter is actually more common that one might assume. The speedometer for a scooter is typically located near the front wheel and is attached by a wire going into the wheel. Occasionally, especially when the scooter is used on bumpy roads, this wire will become loose or fall off completely; in which case, the solution for fixing the broken speedometer is rather simple. However, there are situations when the fix is not as easy to find or fix. Noted below are a few steps you can take to check issue with a speedometer and solutions to repair the issue.

First check the speedometer wire going into the wheel for a proper fit. To accomplish this, you’ll need to unscrew the wire, pull the wire out, then put it back into the housing and make sure it goes in smoothly. As we indicated above, sometimes the speedometer wire can become loose or simply come off track and provide a false reading or no reading at all.

Check the front fairing: If the above solution does not fix the problem, then you will need to take the front fairing off the scooter and unplug the speedometer wire from the back of the speedometer. Then plug it back in and make sure it is secure.

Inspect the wire attached to the speedometer: The only other possible issue causing a speedometer to not work correctly is if the wire attached to the actual speedometer is malfunctioning or does not fit correctly. Check under the handlebars where the wire attaches to the speedometer to determine if this is the situation. If so, reattach the wire correctly.

If it still does not work, then you have a defective speedometer. Contact our sales department at Variety Powersports and we’ll find you the right replacement speedometer for your scooter manufacturer. We have a direct line with manufacturers and can order parts from them quickly and at affordable pricing.

Category: Scooter Help

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My Scooter has Power but it Won’t Start

When you buy a scooter and use it for an extended period, one of the common problems that can pop up unexpectedly is an issue with the starter. If you discover that your scooter has battery power, turn on the key and your lights turn on, but can’t engage the starter, this could be one of two problems; either the starter itself or your starter switch. Regardless of which one it may be, there is a system we recommend using to trace the problem, and solutions for fixing each one based on your own experience or comfort level.

Try to manually start the scooter: The first thing we recommend is to try and manually start your scooter with the start button on the handlebars. If you turn the key on and engage the button, but nothing happens, the problem is going to be electrical; meaning that it’s the starter button, the wires running to the starter relay, the relay itself or the actual starter. If you try to start is manually and the starter engages, but the engine won’t fire, then the problem is with the ignition system or fuel system.

Check the Engine Ignition and Fuel System: In most cases, the problem with a scooter not starting but with power is caused by an issue with the engine; either a bad spark plug wire, bad plug or a fuel system problem.
Checking the Fuel System: In order to check the fuel system, make sure you inspect the fuel lines running from the fuel tank to the fuel pump and to the actual carburetor / fuel injector. If you notice any leaks, replace the hoses with the new ones. You should also inspect the fuel filter and see if it’s clogged up with debris. This is a major reason why engines don’t start, especially if you drive your scooter on dirt roads.
Checking the Ignition System: The other major reason why an engine won’t start is due to the engine not getting the right spark. This is caused by a problem with the spark plug, spark plug wires, or the ignition coil. If you’re experienced in these systems, you’ll know how to check to see if they are the issue. If not, please don’t’ attempt to check electrical components as it could be dangerous and cause injuries. Take your scooter to a certified mechanic to complete this diagnostic check.
Checking the Starter: If the scooter won’t engage the starter when you press the button, it’s probably due to a bad fuse, or problem with the actual starter motor. In this case, you’ll want to inspect the fuses next to the relay or CDI. If the fuses are good, the problem is most likely with the starter and you’ll have to order a new one to replace. At this point, contact our sales technicians at Variety Powersports and order a replacement starter, or contact a local scooter parts supplier or mechanic to see if they can order and replace it for you.
If you’ve completed the above recommended diagnostic inspections and still are having trouble finding the cause of why your scooter won’t start, it is possible that you may have significant engine damage. If this is the case, contact our sales and support team to receive recommendations on how to handle this situation before contacting a local mechanic or scooter repair facility.

Category: Scooter Help

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My Remote is Dead

One of the best perks of owning a new scooter is having a remote starter. However, like any other battery powered system, the remote’s battery will eventually drain and stop working. You’ll want to want to fix the problem sooner rather than later; due to the fact that the remote starter contains memory for the specific frequency of your precise scooter. If you don’t replace the battery soon, the starter can lose this memory and you’ll have to take it to a repair show to be reinitialized.

To replace your battery inside the remote, find a small screw driver (usually a Philips) and remove the screws on the back of the remote.

Find the battery, typically lying flat on the front side of the remote and note the size or model number of the battery. Before removing the battery, purchase a new battery from a store or parts supplier.

Once you have a replacement battery, remove the old battery and replace with the new one, making sure to place it with the right side facing down (usually the + symbol).

Replace the rear cover, insert screws and retighten. Test the remote battery to ensure it works.

Fixing a remote that is dead is rather simple as long as it’s the battery. However, if the remote has been dropped or run over by accident, it can damage components that are not possible to fix. If you discover problems with your battery, or the remote starter, and need a new remote, contact our sales team at Variety Powersports and we’ll be able to direct you on where to buy a replacement remote.

Category: Scooter Help

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My Trunk Rattles

If you’re having a problem with the trunk rattling on a scooter, it’s typically due to a loose fitting trunk or some issues with the inner padding. There are two things you can do to find the root cause and repair this issue that does not require a lot of mechanical experience.

    1. First – check the trunk for tightness: There is a bolt that attaches the trunk to the chassis of the scooter, typically located on the sides of the trunk or on the bottom, inside the trunk and attached under the rear fender. Check to see if this bolt is tight or loose. If it’s loose, simply tighten it up, and it should fix the issue.
  1. Second – check the fitting of the trunk. If you notice that the bolt is tight, but the trunk continues to rattle, it’s probably due to the edge of the trunk simply not fitting securely to the frame. To fix this, remove the trunk, apply some thin weather stripping where the trunk sits on the edge of the frame and reinstall the trunk. This will apply a tighter seal and should solve the issue.

If the above two suggestions don’t fix the problem, it is possible that the trunk is damaged due to a fall, accident or other situation. Check with your manufacturer to see if this is covered under any warranty, but most likely this will be something you’ll have to fix through a local scooter shop or order a replacement unit from the manufacturer. If you need help finding replacement parts, contact our sales team at Variety Powersports.

Category: Scooter Help

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Scooter Starts But Loses Power

If you’re riding down the street in your scooter and suddenly it loses power, it’s typically due to a problem with fuel delivery or with electrical spark. Sometimes it can be as simple as a quick short circuit caused by water splashing onto the motor, or the signs of a more complex situation. Regardless of the cause, there is a system of checks that we recommend you completing before taking your scooter into a mechanic to be repaired; or trying to fix the situation on your own.

  1. Visually inspect all wiring: The primary cause of misfiring engines is due to electrical issues. In fact, 90 percent of all issues like this one are caused by a loose wire or one that has a short. Here is a list of specific items that you should visually check.
    • Check the battery for charge.
    • Check the wires from the battery to the starter and ignition coil
    • Check any fuses next to the relay box. You’ll notice this as there are multiple wires running from one spot near the engine.
    • Check the spark plug wires and the spark plug for signs of fouling. One way to check this is if the spark plug appears to be very wet or if a lot of excess fuel flows out of the spark plug hole after you remove it. This is a sign of a bad spark plug wire, a bad CDI or relay (which is highly unlikely) or a bad spark plug itself. The recommended replacement spark plug for any of our scooters is an NGK CR6HSA or CR7HSA.
  2. Check the Fuel System: The other main reason why your engine would shut off while the engine is running is due to fuel. There are basically three issues that can cause this problem; bad fuel, clogged fuel filters, or carburetor / fuel injector issues. The best way to solve this issue is to empty the fuel tank, inspect all fuel lines and filters, and clean the fuel system (carburetor or fuel injector). If you have experience with this type of mechanical work, you’ll know how to do the job. However, if you don’t, please either call our service department or contact a local scooter mechanic to complete this task. The fuel systems on most scooters we sell are complex and should be worked on by certified or experienced mechanics only.
Category: Scooter Help

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My Wheels Wobble Or Feel Loose

If you’re riding down the street in your scooter and suddenly it loses power, it’s typically due to a problem with fuel delivery or with electrical spark. Sometimes it can be as simple as a quick short circuit caused by water splashing onto the motor, or the signs of a more complex situation. Regardless of the cause, there is a system of checks that we recommend you completing before taking your scooter into a mechanic to be repaired; or trying to fix the situation on your own.

  1. Visually inspect all wiring: The primary cause of misfiring engines is due to electrical issues. In fact, 90 percent of all issues like this one are caused by a loose wire or one that has a short. Here is a list of specific items that you should visually check.
    • Check the battery for charge.
    • Check the wires from the battery to the starter and ignition coil
    • Check any fuses next to the relay box. You’ll notice this as there are multiple wires running from one spot near the engine.
    • Check the spark plug wires and the spark plug for signs of fouling. One way to check this is if the spark plug appears to be very wet or if a lot of excess fuel flows out of the spark plug hole after you remove it. This is a sign of a bad spark plug wire, a bad CDI or relay (which is highly unlikely) or a bad spark plug itself. The recommended replacement spark plug for any of our scooters is an NGK CR6HSA or CR7HSA.
  2. Check the Fuel System: The other main reason why your engine would shut off while the engine is running is due to fuel. There are basically three issues that can cause this problem; bad fuel, clogged fuel filters, or carburetor / fuel injector issues. The best way to solve this issue is to empty the fuel tank, inspect all fuel lines and filters, and clean the fuel system (carburetor or fuel injector). If you have experience with this type of mechanical work, you’ll know how to do the job. However, if you don’t, please either call our service department or contact a local scooter mechanic to complete this task. The fuel systems on most scooters we sell are complex and should be worked on by certified or experienced mechanics only.
Category: Scooter Help

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Scooter Maintenance

When you’ve just invested in a new scooter, you want to make sure it’s taken care of properly. The way to accomplish this is by completing routine service and maintenance. Believe it or not, maintenance for a scooter is very easy. Posted below are a few basic tips that when followed can significantly improve the lifecycle of your new scooter from Variety Powersports.

    1. Replace Engine Oil After Break-in: Each scooter that is sold by Variety Powersports is shipped to customers with engine oil already inside the crankcase. This engine oil is specifically engineered for the break-in period; which ranges from 50 to 100 miles depending on the manufacturer. It’s recommended that you change the oil in your scooter right after this break-in period. The recommended replacement oil is 10W40, four-stroke motor oil. Here are the instructions for changing your oil for a scooter:
      • Drain Oil from Crank Case: There is a bolt located on the bottom of the scooter that needs to be removed in order to drain the old oil from the engine. Locate the bolt then unscrew the bolt to allow the oil to drain naturally from the engine. Once all of the oil has been removed, replace the engine oil screw to its original location and tighten appropriately.
      • Purchase and Replace Oil: As noted above, you’ll want to purchase at least two quarts of 10w40 four stroke engine oil. It is highly recommended to use NON-SYNTHETIC or conventional motor oil. Do NOT use synthetic or synthetic-blend oil. Most of our scooters take 1.5 quarts of oil, but check with the manufacturer’s recommendations before adding new oil to the scooter. We recommend changing oil every 500 miles on the scooter.
    2. Check Coolant Levels: If you have a scooter that is water-cooled, you need to frequently check the levels of coolant. The coolant collection device is semi-transparent, so it’s rather simple for a scooter owner to check the levels. To find the coolant cylinder, look behind the front wheel through the front fender. Check the coolant level before any extended trip. To add coolant, use distilled water and standard engine coolant for a four-stroke motor.
    1. Check front and rear axles: Another maintenance item recommended for scooters is checking the front and rear axle for tightness. Occasionally these critical components will come loose due to frequent use; especially if the scooter is used off road or on bumps frequently.
    1. Tighten mirrors and handlebars: Like the axel, the handlebars and side mirrors can also become loose from time to time. We recommend checking these items once per month, and tighten as needed.
  1. Change tires: It’s very difficult to recommend an interval for changing tires, but it’s important that you don’t drive a scooter on tires that are cracked or are showing extensive wear. A good rule of thumb is to check your tread depth every 500 miles when you’re changing oil. When the tire grooves are starting to wear out unevenly or if they are worn out, replace them as soon as possible. Also, if you’re noticing that your tire pressure is always low, it’s a good indication of a small leak; and should be replaced – not repaired.

As with any other vehicle, proper scooter maintenance can extend the life of your vehicle for years. If you have any questions about service or maintenance for your scooter, please contact our sales team at Variety Powersports. We’re here to help.

Category: Scooter Help

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Regulations

If you have remote start, try and start the scooter. If it does not start, then follow the red wire from the battery to the starter relay, make sure the wire is connected, and then run the red wire from the starter relay to the actual starter. Secure this tightly. Try to start the scooter. If it still won’t start, run the negative wire to the ground on the scooter frame and make sure there is full contact and the wire is connected. If it won’t start and you don’t hear any clicking from the starter, then you probably have a bad starter. Call our techs at this point and get a starter on its way to you.

One other thing you can check is to remove the housing on the handlebars into which the start switch is plugged, take the housing apart, and make sure the button is making contact withthe switch. If you have remote start and the bike WILL start using remote start but NOT by pressing the button, then you probably have a loose wire connecting to your relay or cdi. Check the wires and make sure they are all plugged in. On a side note, check the spark plug and ignition coil. If your starter is clicking whenever you press your start button, but it does not start, this might be a reason. However, because this is so rare it’s almost not worth mentioning.

To check spark (and ONLY do this AFTER you have tried EVERYTHING mentioned above) you will need to unscrew the spark plug from the engine. This can usually be done by removing the panel under the seat. To find it, you will see a black wire with a huge piece on the end plugged into the engine. Take the ignition coil off the spark plug, unscrew the spark plug, and then plug the spark plug back into the ignition coil when it is out of the engine. Hold the ignition coil (NOT THE SPARK PLUG IN ANY WAY OR YOU WILL BE ELECTROCUTED IF IT DOES HAVE SPARK!!!!!!!!) and then press the spark plug end to a bolt connected to the frame (a ground). Then press the start switch. If the spark plug does not spark, get a new spark plug. The plug is an NGK CR6HSA or CR7HSA. Put the new spark plug into the ignition coil and press start again. If it still does not spark, then you probably have a bad ignition coil.

Category: Scooter Help

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Tax Title, & License (TT&L)

Buying a new scooter from cccc gives you the ability to have an easy-to-drive mode of transportation anywhere the roads may take you. However, in order to drive it on city or county roads, you’re going to have to register it with your local DMV first. We receive a lot of questions about this process – however, the reality is that registration processes are unique for each US State and may vary depending on the county you live. Noted below is a generic instruction guideline that will show you the basics about registering your scooter in the municipality you live.

  1. Contact Us to Receive MCO: Once you receive your scooter the first thing you should do is to contact Variety Powersports so we can complete the Manufactured Certificate of Origin (MCO). In order to accomplish this, we’ll need you to provide the VIN number, which is a 17-digit number that will be noted on the actual scooter and perhaps on the documentation in your order form. Once we have the VIN and your contact information, you’ll receive the MCO and Bill of Sale, which you’ll need in order to register the scooter with your DMV.
  2. Get Insurance for your Scooter: After you receive your MCO and Bill of Sale, you’ll need to contact an insurance company to activate a policy for your scooter for on road driving. Virtually all DMVs require you to show proof of insurance in order to register any motor vehicle in the state. Most scooter insurance policies are rather inexpensive, ranging from $50 to $100 per year.
  3. Set up a Vehicle Inspection: As we indicated above, each US State has different requirements for registering a vehicle for on road use. Most states require that any vehicle pass a safety inspection, completed by an authorized location. Contact your local DMV to determine which facility is acceptable to inspect your scooter (if needed), before trying to register the scooter.

After you’ve completed all of the required items to gain all the documentation you need to register the scooter with your local DMV, complete the process with your DMV office. They will provide you with all the required documentation, license plate, registration paper work and title (if applicable) once you visit the DMV.

Category: Scooter Help

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Scooter Assembly

Each scooter sold from Variety Powersports is shipped to customers directly in a secure crate that is designed to protect the scooter during transportation to your home or office. Once you take delivery of your new scooter, there is a process that we recommend for unpacking the scooter and completing the final assembly. As with any of the products we sell, if you’re not 100% confident about unpacking and assembling your new scooter, we’ll be happy to walk you through the process or help find a local expert that can assist you with this task.

Here are the steps for unpacking and assembly for your new scooter:

  1. Unpack the Crate: Remove all bolts from the bottom of the crate that are connected to the top of the crate. Once the bolts have been removed, and the top has been removed, inspect the crate to find a packing list that will document what is supposed to be packed inside the crate. Before removing the scooter, inspect the crate to verify that all items are contained inside the crate that is listed on the packing slip. After verifying the inventory of the packing list, carefully remove all items and place them aside for now.
  2. Remove the Axel Bolt: The next step is to remove the axel bolt that holds the scooter secure inside the crate. The bolt needs to be removed from the side of the scooter, so if you need to, remove that side of the crate so you can easily get to it. Remove the axle bolt, dispose of the nut, but keep the spacer as you might need this to assemble the front tire. Once the bolt has been removed, take the scooter completely out of the crate for easy access to complete the assembly.
  3. Remove the seat & install accessories: There is a trunk that is located on the back of the scooter (on most models we sell). Typically, these are taped down during shipping, but in order to remove it you’ll have to open the lock with the key. They key is usually inside the ignition, but may be contained inside a package in the crate. Once you open the seat, take the battery, mirrors, tool kit and other items that are inside and place them aside. Once you’ve removed all the items, find the instructions for each specific item and install them as indicated on the manufacturer’s directions.
  4. Prepare the battery: The battery that was located inside the trunk of the scooter needs to be installed on the actual scooter. Some batteries are fully assembled and don’t require the steps following. However, if your battery comes with acid, you’ll need to follow these steps. Take the battery out of the trunk and locate the area where the battery needs to be installed. You will poke a hole in each of the 6 battery acid holes and push the battery housing down on the battery acid piece. Once this has been completed, put the battery on the ground facing down and the acid housing pointed up. There is a “pin” inside the install kit, using this pin, “poke” holes in the top of the acid housing. Be careful that you do not accidently get battery acid on yourself, if you do, wash it off immediately with soap and water. When the acid is fully inside the housing, remove the acid housing and put the plug strip on the battery.
  5. Install Battery: Open the seat on the scooter (or sometimes the floorboard on the 50 and 150s) and plug the battery in with the battery bolts supplied. The black plug needs to be installed on the negative terminal on the battery and the two red wires (sometimes just one) on the positive. This will give the scooter power. Do not turn on the scooter yet. Let the battery sit for 30 minutes, it will ensure the battery will start.
  6. Install front wheel: As noted above, if your scooter has a loose front wheel inside the crate, you’ll have to install it onto the scooter. This step is best accomplished by placing the scooter on the stand.
    • Take the front wheel and align the disk to the brake.
    • Place the spacer on the brake side. Once the tire and spacer are aligned to the fork, put the axle bolt through the fork, then the spacer, then the tire.
    • After the axle bolt is through the tire, align the speedometer mounting which also acts as a spacer. Align this to the left side of the tire. The speedometer mounting will have a slit in it; make sure this is inserted into the fork when aligning the other side of the wheel to the axle bolt hole on the fork. When aligned, finish pushing the axle bolt through, and then put the lock nut provided in the bolt back on the axle and tighten the axle bolt.
  7. Add lubricants as recommended by the manufacturer: Follow the instructions provided for adding lubricants including oil and coolant’s (if needed). Most of the scooters we sell already have lubricants (oil and coolant) already added. It’s critical for you to double-check the levels however prior to starting your scooter for the first time.
  8. Add premium gasoline: After all lubricants have been added, and all bolts have been tightened, you are ready to finish the assembly by adding fuel. Variety Powersports recommends that you add only premium gasoline (minimum of 89 octane), as these engines are engineered to run on this type of unleaded gasoline.

If you discover that there are any parts missing from the crate in step one of the assembly listed above, please contact the sales and support team at Variety Powersports before moving on with additional assembly. If you have any questions about any steps above, don’t hesitate to contact our sales team. We’re here to help.

Category: Scooter Help
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